Draft Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment

Consultation has concluded. Many thanks for your feedback.  This project is being reported to Council on 29 June 2016.

The public exhibition of the draft Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment (CZMP BBE) closed on Tuesday 14 June 2016. A submissions report will be considered by Council at 29 June 2016 Extraordinary meeting.

The public exhibition of the draft Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment (CZMP BBE) closed on Tuesday 14 June 2016. A submissions report will be considered by Council at 29 June 2016 Extraordinary meeting.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • I notice the photos provided on this QandA submit page show one photo of Clarkes Beach which includes a view to Cape Byron, and a second aerial photo of the existing sandbag/rock barrier in place at Belongil presently, with a line drafted parallel to that showing the length/area of proposed major new Sea wall. The photo of Clarkes beach will never look like that picture shown from this date onwards [10.06.2016]. In the last week a series of extra high tides and wave action in the aftermath of the pass over of the June 3-5 megastorm on the Northern Rivers, has removed out to sea millions of tonnes of sand dune and beach formation. The profile of sand loss being between 1.5 and 6 metres height along several hundred metres length of beach. The second photo, a flyover or satellite shot of residential Belongil from above, clearly reveals that where any rock and/or sandbag boundary, or any wall is placed to allegedly protect property from storm damage, the result is a massive reduction in width of beach for people and wildlife to use or inhabit. My questions are: Have Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment made any visit of Clarkes Beach in this week that this question submission is referring too? What is their assessment of the severe erosion event? Has their been a visit to the base of the 6 metre high sand escarpment now immediately below the Beach Cafe's boardwalk? Has there been a walk tour by Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment along the full length of Clarkes Beach to the Byron Surf Lifesaver Club for an observation of effects of wayward eddies during storms caused by the existing sea wall at Belongil? Is a compensation plan for Tourism and Local Amenity of Byron Bay underway yet? If not when shall a study of Effects On Tourism and Local Amenity by Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment be implimented? Can a complete hold be put on any decision regarding commencing contracting any more seawall works at Belongil while a comprehensive assessment of the sand and dune loss at Clarkes Beach and all other beaches in the Byron Shire is conducted?

    David Ngoz asked about 3 years ago

    Council has a coastal monitoring program in place and the most recent hazard assessment (BMT WBM, 2013) identified a short term storm bite of up to 30 metres at Clarkes Beach (1 in 100 year design storm), as well as a long term recession rate of 0.20 metres per year. Largely, these short term and long term trends at this location are a result of complex and interacting, natural coastal processes. For more information on the projected position of the shoreline at Clarkes Beach, refer to Part B, Section B1.3, Figure 6.

    The cost benefit analysis undertaken as part of the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016) considered and quantified the effects of the different management options in terms of recreational and tourism amenity. This  report is in the document library, the cost benefit analysis is at Appendix N.


  • How much beach will we lose if the rock wall is built? Considering the rock wall in front of the Main Beach car park it looks like we can say goodbye to a big stretch of Belongil beach. I would hate to see this happen and the cost to the community and environment will be devastating. I feel for the home owners but surely they have been aware of this impending doom for many years. Can you tell me what the planned retreat policy was and when was it policy for relocatable homes to be built at Belongil?

    Tracey asked about 3 years ago

    The upgrade of the protection works at Main Beach is to provide for improved public beach access and a viewing platform. Refer Part B Figure 20.

    According to Council’s consultants the removal of the spur groynes at Jonson Street (Main Beach) may result in a minor realignment of the shoreline and narrowing of the beach  adjacent the works. The changes are expected to be minor, as the temporary increase in sand transport caused by the removal of the groynes represents only a small portion of the overall sediment budget for the area. Refer Part B, Figure 20 and Figure 50, WorleyParsons, 2014).

    The proposed seawall with walkway strategy at Belongil Beach represents an engineered replacement of the status quo (except the Jetty Site), with the provision of improved beach access by including a public walkway / promenade and two public beach accesses, in addition to the Manfred Street access.

    Planned retreat is broad strategy containing many different components, one of which is planning. In 1988 the principle of relocating or removing development in relation to the position of the coastal erosion escarpment was incorporated into Council’s Local Environment Plan and Development Control Plan.

    In 2011, it was reported to Council that nine properties in the Belongil beach front area had residential structures with provisions requiring the relocation of the entirety of that development in relation to the position of the erosion escarpment. Seven properties had structures with a partial restriction placed on the development i.e. through an approved alteration or addition to an existing structure. At the time of the audit, there were 28 properties in the Belongil beach front area. For more information, refer Part B, Appendix 3.


  • Hello .. the proposed sea wall clearly delineates an area of privately owned properties. I understand from their owners point of view this is desirable, but I would like to know the actual cost that would be paid by rate payers as opposed to those owners to protect their properties. Many sea walls deteriorate with time and tempest, so what are the on going management strategies , and who will be covering future maintenance costs ? What are the benefits to the larger community. Groyne s built at the gold coast have caused major problems and the need for sand pumping/ replenishing, some such as one near Kirra have disappeared at times under the sand. Maybe its best to let what has been in place for a millennium continue to do what nature has in store for it. I note that land at New Brighton as you go out to the river , the dirt road which was devastated by storms some years ago was resumed , why should Belongil be any different know. It sets a precedent for those original New Brighton land holders potentially I would have thought ( to similarly have their sites protected / re instated )

    David. asked about 3 years ago

    The funding model proposed for the Belongil seawall is based on the following CZMP BBE Management Objective 5:

    To prioritise public expenditure for public benefit and apply principles of equity in determining who will fund the implementation of management strategies / actions.

    Accordingly, the hypothetical funding model in the draft CZMP BBE is based on the following logic:

    ·  Private landholder funds – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. private land adjacent the beach

    ·  Public – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. public land adjacent the beach

    A hypothetical funding model on construction and maintenance costs for all of the coastal hazard risk management strategies in the draft CZMP BBE, is at Part B, Section B3.6.9, Table 10 and 11.

  • Why are the coastal zoning laws that were emplaced in 1988 being blatantly ignored by residents of the Belongil spit? Are rate payers expected to pay for the maintainance of a beach wall that should never be built in the first place? Doesn't anyone realise that building the beach wall will actually increase erosion rates along this part of the coast? Does anyone realise that Belongil Creek use to historically exit through Manfred Street?

    Dylan asked about 3 years ago

    Council conducted an audit of development in the immediate beachfront area of Belongil Beach in 2011. A summary of the findings from the coastal audit are at Part B of the draft CZMP BBE, Appendix 3, Section B3. After noting the findings of the coastal audit, Council resolved as follows:

    11-517 Resolved (relevant part only):

    2. That Council advise landowners of the proximity of development to the erosion escarpment and any associated risks for their consideration.

    The funding model proposed for the Belongil seawall is based on the following CZMP BBE Management Objective 5:

    To prioritise public expenditure for public benefit and apply principles of equity in determining who will fund the implementation of management strategies / actions.

    In this context, the funding model for both the construction and maintenance of the seawalls would be based on the following logic:

    ·  Private landholder funds – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. beach frontage.

    ·  Public – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. beach frontage.

    It is generally accepted that seawalls have the following impacts on coastal processes and the beach profile (Basco, 2004 based on Dean, 1986):

    ·  Frontal effects – toe scour, depth increases

    ·  End of wall effects – flanking

    ·  Blockage of littoral drift when projecting into surf zone (groyne effect)

    ·  Reduced beach width fronting armouring

    Historically the Belongil Creek has meandered and the entrance has changed position. Council’s consultant’s noted the former creek entrance as denoted by the cadastre, and that the entrance could shift south to Manfred Street. Further information is at the draft CZMP BBE, Part B, especially Section B1.2.

  • Is it true that there may be negative legal ramifications for council if we proceed with planned retreat? Is the existence of the car park, pool and groin at the end of Jonson street causing faster erosion on Belongil, therefore Belongil beachfront residents would most likely win a court case against planned retreat?

    Michael asked about 3 years ago

    A group of Belongil land owners have commenced proceedings against Council regarding the works at Jonson Street. Council denies it would be legally liable to compensate those landowners and is defending the proceedings.


  • To minimise erosion impacts and assist with sand accumulation why hasn't the coast plan considered a series of false reefs north of the wreck to north of belongil creek mouth. They can be built of chain and old tyres with concrete blocks to stabilise. This was done many years ago in south Australia off Glenelg and reef has much fish life . The false reefs may create or enhance surf breaks in the bay as added benefit.

    surfing63 asked about 3 years ago

    Council’s consultants considered offshore reefs. This option was not shortlisted for more detailed assessment. The consultant’s findings are summarised at Part B of the draft CZMP BBE, Appendix 1, Table 2. There is a more detailed assessment at Appendix D and E of the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016).

  • Exactly where will the wall be placed?

    Mela Macquarrie asked about 3 years ago

    The approximate extent of the proposed seawall is 1.1 km (1100 m). It would largely replace the existing works extending from adjacent the Border Street roundabout, to adjacent the most northern privately owned beachfront property at Belongil Beach.

    See image in the photos section on this page.
  • Does the plan include the management and possible protection of the Loggerhead (endangered as per the EPBC Federal act) and Green turtle nesting areas along the New Brighton and South Golden beach area as surveyed and noted by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

    Michael asked about 3 years ago

    No, it does not.

    The draft CZMP BBE (Part A to D) describes management strategies for the Byron Bay Embayment – that is, the coastline that is a beach from the southern end of Tyagarah Nature Reserve to Cape Byron. New Brighton and South Golden Beach are not covered in these parts of the draft plan.

    Part E of the draft plan is an emergency action sub plan for the Byron Shire Coastline, this includes actions that Council will take in a coastal erosion emergency for New Brighton and South Golden Beaches. The emergency action sub plan details potential actions that Council will take in the event of a coastal erosion emergency. Refer Part E, Section E4 of draft CZMP BBE.

  • Are there any rock wall groynes planned for the New Brighton and South Golden Beach area under this plan.

    Michael asked about 3 years ago

    No.

    The draft CZMP BBE (Part A to D) describes management strategies for the Byron Bay Embayment – that is, the coastline that is a beach from the southern end of Tyagarah Nature Reserve to Cape Byron. New Brighton and South Golden Beach are not covered in these parts of the draft plan.

    Part E of the draft plan is an emergency action sub plan for the Byron Shire Coastline, this includes actions that Council will take in a coastal erosion emergency for New Brighton and South Golden Beaches. The emergency action sub plan details potential actions that Council will take in the event of a coastal erosion emergency. These actions do not include rock wall groynes. Refer Part E, Section E4 of draft CZMP BBE.

  • Why is it necessary to spend vast sums of money (the Shire doesn't have) to construct rock walls to protect land owners on the Belongil? They have been notified since the mid 70's that there are ocean impact zones which define the likelihood that their properties will be directly impacted by coastal processes in the future. They were also made aware that the costs to address the damage will be theirs. Why is Council not standing by this advice which should have been conveyed to current and prospective owners whenever a property was sold or a development proposed.

    recycler asked about 3 years ago

    1. The draft CZMP BBE has been prepared on the basis of Council resolution 16-169.

    The funding model proposed for the Belongil seawall is based on the following CZMP BBE Management Objective 5:

    To prioritise public expenditure for public benefit and apply principles of equity in determining who will fund the implementation of management strategies / actions.

    In this context, the funding model would be based on the following logic:

    • Private landholder funds – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. beach frontage.

    • Public – proportional, based on a measure of benefit e.g. beach frontage.

    A hypothetical funding model is presented at Part B, section B3, Table 10.

    2.  The background to Council Resolution 16-169 is documented at Council Report No. 13.5, Ordinary Meeting Agenda 7 April 2016. This can be found in the ‘document library’ - Council Reports.

  • This proposed rock wall at Belongil, at 1.6 km, where is it proposed it should run from and to?

    nickB asked about 3 years ago

    The approximate extent of the proposed seawall is 1.1 km (1100 m). It would largely replace the existing works extending from adjacent the Border Street roundabout, to adjacent the most northern privately owned beachfront property at Belongil Beach.

  • Why can't you buy the landowners out and continue with planned/managed retreat? If you buy the landowners out, do you have to purchase the land at market value? Is the land of very little 'market value' given that it is at risk from coastal erosion and nobody in the market will be prepared to buy the land knowing that it is prone to erosion? Has an artificial reef ever been considered to protect the coastline along the Belongil foreshore from storm waves and can you present the research findings or feasibility study? Sand/beach nourishment is unsustainable. I would like to know that it isn't going to happen, can that be guaranteed by the council?

    Pid asked about 3 years ago

    The draft CZMP BBE has been drafted in accordance with Council Resolution 16-169, which includes an adaptive seawall with walkway for Belongil Beach.  The draft CZMP BBE is not advocating the purchase of private land.

    Council’s consultants examined planned retreat (public/private funding model) as well as engineering protection options. The consultant did not recommend planned retreat. Refer Part B, Appendix 2, section ES.6 of the draft CZMP BBE for more details, or section 16.3 of the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016).

    As part of the coastal hazard risk management strategy for the BBE and Belongil Beach, planning and development controls will be reviewed and updated to provide for the adaptation of development.

    Regarding your question about an artificial reef:

    Council’s consultants examined offshore breakwaters. This option was not shortlisted for more detailed assessment. The consultant’s findings are summarised at Part B of the draft CZMP BBE, Appendix 1, Table 2. There is a more detailed assessment at Appendix D and E of the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016).

    Question re sand nourishment:

    Council’s consultants investigated a three stage adaptive management protection scheme for Belongil Beach that included potential groyne(s) and beach nourishment (small scale) as  second and third stages after constructing seawalls. The three stage option was not found
    to be economically viable after consideration of costs and benefits - including recreational and tourism values associated with increased beach width.

    The draft CZMP BBE does not propose beach nourishment over the plan’s 15 year timeframe. The plan is based on an ‘adaptive management’ approach. Adaptive management is a decision making framework that reflects the need to respond to changing conditions. It is based on a process of plan, decide, implement, monitor, adapt and plan once more.

    Other stages in the ‘adaptive management protection scheme’ may be implemented at some time in the future e.g. groyne(s), small scale beach nourishment to mitigate the impacts of the
    seawalls. These stages are beyond the scope of this CZMP implementation timeframe of 15 years, and will require further investigation, including monitoring and analysis of the impacts of implementing Stage 1 - adaptive ‘seawall with walkway’.