CZMP process scope

    What is a CZMP?

    A Coastal Zone Management Plan (CZMP) is a statutory document, made under the Coastal Protection Act 1979, that describes proposed actions to address priority management issues relevant to a part of the ‘coastal zone’ over a defined implementation period. These issues include: 

    • Managing risks to public safety and built assets
    • Community uses of the coastal zone
    • Pressures on coastal ecosystems

    The ‘coastal zone’ consists of the area between the western boundary of the coastal zone shown on the maps outlining the coastal zone and the outermost boundary of the coastal waters of the State. The coastal waters of the State extend, generally, to 3 nautical miles from the coastline of the State.

    For more information see the Draft CZMP BBE, Part A1.2  and Coastal Protection Act 1979. 

     

    Why do we need a draft CZMP?

    In October 2011, the Minister for the Environment directed Byron Shire Council to make a CZMP for the area that is a ‘beach’ between south Tyagarah Beach and Cape Byron.

    Councils must make a CZMP if directed to do so by the Minister.

    The ‘beach’ means the area of unconsolidated or other readily erodable material between the
    highest level reached by wave action and the place where tidal or lake waters reach a depth of 10 metres below Australian Height Datum.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A1.2 and the Coastal Protection Act 1979.

     

    Why did the Minister direct Council to make a CZMP for the area that is a ‘beach’ between south Tyagarah Beach and Cape Byron?

    Belongil Beach has been categorised as a ‘coastal erosion hot spot’ by the NSW Government. These are areas where there are:

    …five or more houses and/or a public road are located in a current (or immediate) coastal hazard area, as identified in a coastal hazard study. (OEH website)

    Given the erosion risks along Belongil Beach, the Minister directed Council to make the CZMP.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE Part A, and the Office of Environment and Heritage website 

     

    What area does the draft CZMP focus on?

    The draft CZMP applies to the area that is a beach between south Tyagarah Beach and Cape Byron, including Belongil, Main and Clarkes Beaches, Byron Bay. The term ‘Byron Bay Embayment’ refers to this geographic area.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A1.5

     

    What is the vision of the draft CZMP, how is it reflected in the plan?

    The Vision of the draft CZMP is:

    To manage the Byron Bay Embayment coastal zone in a strategic and adaptive manner, balancing environmental, economic and social values, costs and benefits, in the context of complexity and uncertainty.

    The Vision is related to the 11 CZMP Management Objectives. The 11 Management Objectives are linked to the on ground actions in the CZMP.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A1.1 and Part A - Table 1.

     

    Are areas like Suffolk Park, Brunswick Heads, New Brighton and South Golden Beach included in the draft CZMP?

    The draft CZMP focuses on the Byron Bay Embayment, in accordance with the scope of the Minister’s Direction.

    Suffolk Park, Brunswick Heads, New Brighton and South Golden Beach are included in Part E of the CZMP – which is an Emergency Action Sub Plan for the Byron Shire Coastline. This deals with coastal erosion emergencies. It is important that there is an emergency response to coastal erosion for all parts of the Byron Shire coastline.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A1.2 and Draft CZMP BBE, Part EPart E.

     

    How were the actions in the draft CZMP determined?

    The management actions that underpin the draft CZMP for managing coastal hazard risks were determined by Council resolution (16 - 169).

    There have been many decades of expert investigations and studies into coastal zone management in Byron Shire. The most recent of these studies was the ‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’ (WRL, 2016). The process for considering the coastal hazard risk management options in the draft CZMP BBE is summarised at Figure 17, Part B.

    At key stages of preparing the draft CZMP, state agency, Councillor, community and stakeholder feedback has been sought. This feedback has helped to decide which management options are likely to be the most feasible and reasonable.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A (Appendix 2 and 3) and Part B2, including Appendix 1 and 2.  

     

    How many years does the draft CZMP provide planning for?

    The CZMP provides for a 15 year implementation period,  in consideration of current and forecasted coastal hazards and risks for 2050 and 2100.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A.

     

Overarching strategy

    Who will pay for implementing the draft CZMP?

    The funding model for upgrading the coastal protection works at Main Beach and for implementing the ‘adaptive seawall at walkway’ at Belongil Beach (private/public funding model) will be based on Management Objective 5:

    To prioritise public expenditure for public benefit and apply principles of equity in determining who will fund the implementation of management strategies / actions.

    For Belongil Beach, the funding model would include both private landholder funds and public funds, proportional to a calculation of the benefit derived through the provision of the seawall.

    For Main Beach, the funding model is likely to include public funds, from both Council and state and federal governments.

    A hypothetical funding model is presented at Part B - Table 10 and 11. This model measures benefit in terms of beach frontage.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, Section B3.

     

    What is adaptive management?

    Adaptive management is a decision making framework that reflects the need to respond to  changing conditions. It is based on a process of plan, decide, implement, monitor, adapt and plan once more.

    This approach is necessary due to uncertainties associated with climate, especially anthropogenic climate change, in consideration of the 2050 and 2100 timeframes.

    In addition, there are implementation uncertainties associated with the strategic nature of this CZMP.  These include, but are not limited to: 

    • agreement from landowners / land managers
    • any necessary approvals
    • change of circumstances
    • safety
    • available resources
    • obtaining necessary funding
    • time constraints

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part A, Section A and Part B, Section B3

     

    What happened to planned retreat?

    ‘Planned retreat’ (public/private) was evaluated in the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment. This option was not recommended by the consultant; refer section ES.6 and 16.3 of the Coastal Hazard Management Study Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016).

    However, as part of the coastal hazard risk management strategy for the BBE, planning and development controls will be reviewed and updated to provide for the adaptation of development.

    How will the protection works proposed in the CZMP affect the beach and beach access?

    The upgrade of the protection works at Jonson Street Main Beach is to provide for improved  public beach access and a viewing platform. Refer Part B Figure 20.

    According to Council’s consultants the removal of the spur groynes may result in a minor realignment of the shoreline and narrowing of the beach  adjacent the works. The changes are expected to be minor, as the temporary increase in sand transport caused by the removal of the groynes represents only a small portion of the overall sediment budget for the area. Refer Part B, Figure 20 and Figure 50,WorleyParsons, 2014.

    The proposed seawall with walkway strategy at Belongil Beach represents an engineered replacement of the status quo (except the Jetty Site), with the provision improved beach access by including a public walkway / promenade  and two public beach accesses, in addition to the Manfred Street access.

    Further questions under the FAQs 'Belongil Beach' folder details the impacts that seawalls may have on coastal processes and the beach profile.

    For more information see the ‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’ (WRL, 2016)

     



     

     

     

    Are groynes needed?

    The CZMP does not propose the construction of groynes.

    Council’s consultants (WRL, 2016) investigated a three stage adaptive management protection scheme for Belongil Beach that included a trial groyne and additional groynes as potential stages after constructing seawalls. The ‘seawall only’ option performs economically better, after consideration of costs and benefits associated with groynes including recreational and tourism
    values associated with increased beach width.

    According to Council’s consultants (WRL, 2016):

    Progress to later stages would be warranted if triggers within the adaptive scheme are reached, however, economic modelling indicates that, relative to the status quo, the cost of increasing beach width (above the status quo) over a 1 km stretch of Belongil is not economically viable.

    For more information see the ‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’ (WRL, 2016) 

     

    Will the beaches be nourished with sand?

    The CZMP does not propose beach nourishment.

    Council’s consultants investigated a three stage adaptive management protection scheme for Belongil Beach that included potential groyne(s) and beach nourishment (small scale) as second and third stages after constructing seawalls. The three stage option is not economically viable after consideration of costs and benefits - including recreational and tourism values associated with increased beach width.

    According to Council’s consultants (WRL, 2016):

    Progress to later stages would be warranted if triggers within the adaptive scheme are reached, however, economic modelling indicates that, relative to the status quo, the cost of increasing beach width (above the status quo) over a 1 km stretch of Belongil is not economically viable.

    For more information see the Coastal Hazard Management Study - Byron Bay Embayment (WRL, 2016)




     

    Will the beaches be nourished by pumping sand from Tallows Beach?

    The CZMP does not propose beach nourishment.

    Council has rejected consideration of a sand nourishment scheme at Tallow Beach (Res 15-476).  See Councils website for meeting agenda and minutes for 17 September 2015.

    For more information see ‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’ (WRL, 2016)

     

Coastal hazards

    What coastal hazards are dealt with in the draft CZMP?

    • Beach erosion - the offshore movement of sand from the sub-aerial beach during storms;
    • Shoreline recession – a net long term landward movement of the shoreline , relating to a long term deficit in the sediment budget, and sea level rise in the future;
    • Coastal watercourse entrance instability (i.e. Belongil Estuary entrance) – the tendency of estuary entrances to migrate along the shore, close up, reopen, form new entrances etc. in response to wave and current action and freshwater flows
    • Coastal inundation – storm related flooding of coastal lands by ocean waters due to elevated still water levels (storm surge) and wave run-up.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, B1.

     

    Why is coastal erosion a problem in the Byron Bay Embayment (BBE)?

    The BBE experiences major coastal storms (or series of storms) which generate large coastal waves and elevated water levels. These storms can cause erosion of sand from the beach face and dunal system.

    Where development and infrastructure is located close to the coastline and there is an insufficient volume of sand to provide a buffer against the action of storm waves, it may be at risk from coastal erosion.

    According to council’s consultants (BMT WBM, 2013) there is development and infrastructure at immediate risk from coastal erosion in the BBE, most notably at Belongil Beach. The NSW Government has also recognised that Belongil Beach is a ‘coastal erosion hotspot’. These are areas where there are:

    …five or more houses and/or a public road are located in a current (or immediate) coastal hazard area, as identified in a coastal hazard study. (OEH website)

    Expert studies undertaken over several decades (e.g. PWD, 1978 and BMT WBM, 2013) have concluded that the BBE is experiencing long term recession. This means that, over time, not all sand eroded during a storm returns back to the beach, resulting in a gradual landward shift of the shoreline over time. Recession of the coastline will be exacerbated by sea level rise.

    For more information see ‘Byron Shire Coastline Hazards Assessment Update’  (BMT WBM, 2013) and the Office Environment and Heritage website 

     

    How will climate change affect coastal hazards in the BBE?

    Anthropogenic climate change is likely to exacerbate long term recession of the shoreline as a result of elevated water levels (sea level rise). 

    Elevated water levels mean that wave, tide and wind processes occur at a higher position on the beach face, with the beach and dune moving landward to return to equilibrium with the new sea level (shoreline recession).

    Higher sea levels will increase the risk of coastal inundation due to:

    • Potential shoreline recession into lower hind dune areas along Belongil Spit where the prevailing dune heights are relatively low.
    • Higher sea levels relative to the existing dune and seawall crest levels.

    The coastal erosion hazard lines in the CZMP are based on sea level rise projections of 0.34m and 0.84m for 2050 and 2100 respectively, relative to 2010 levels (BSC Policy No 14/006, 2014). An estimated sea level rise of 0.06m relative to 1990 is reflected in the baseline position of the shoreline. The hazard lines include sensitivity provisions to account for uncertainties associated with beach system response to sea level rise.

    Anthropogenic climate change may also affect storm frequency and intensity e.g. wave heights, barometric pressure, wave and wind set-up, as well as wave direction and climate variability. Due to an absence of reliable, appropriately scaled data, these factors have not been incorporated into the hazard lines for 2050 and 2100.

    For more information see ‘Byron Shire Coastline Hazards Assessment Update’ (BMT WBM, 2013)

     

Belongil Beach

    What are the main actions in the draft CZMP for managing coastal hazards at Belongil Beach?

    The main coastal hazard risk management strategy for Belongil Beach is the ‘adaptive seawall with walkway’. This comprises the upgrade / potential reconstruction of a existing seawalls including an alongshore walkway and two public accesses on to the beach (in addition to the Manfred Street access). Planning and development controls will provide for the adaptation of the seawall and adjacent development over time and in response to certain conditions.

    The preliminary concept design for the adaptive seawall with walkway is at Part B Figure 18.

    What is an ‘adaptive seawall with walkway’?

    An ‘adaptive seawall with walkway’ includes: 

    • Design and construction of an ‘adaptive seawall’ from Border Street to the northernmost private property, incorporating an alongshore walkway in the structure
    • Planning and development controls to provide for the adaptation of the works i.e. maintenance, potential upgrade, modification and/or potential removal of the works and rectification of the beach
    • Monitoring program – adjacent, up and downdrift of the works to monitor impacts
    • Planning and development control to provide for the potential relocation and/or removal of development through consideration of elements such as structure design, materials and spatial dimensions.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3

     

    What will the Belongil seawalls with walkway look like?

    The design is yet to be finalised, the consultants have provided a preliminary design at Part B Figure 18.

    The below image shows the approximate extent of the proposed seawall.

    It would largely replace the existing works extending from adjacent the Border Street roundabout, to adjacent the most northern privately owned beachfront property at Belongil Beach and be approximately 1.1 km (1100 m) in length.

     



     

     


     

    Will I still be able to access Belongil Beach, is the beach being privatised?

    The implementation of the ‘adaptive seawall with walkway’ strategy will provide for a public alongshore walkway and two public beach accesses, additional to the Manfred Street access. This is considered an improvement on the current access arrangements at Belongil Beach (WRL, 2016).

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3

    How will the Belongil Beach seawalls affect surfing conditions?

    The strategy is about replacing the current works at Belongil Beach with engineered structures (with the exception of the Jetty Site, which does not currently have a complete seawall). In this context, it is not expected that the seawalls will significantly alter current surfing conditions beyond the status quo.

    For more information see ‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’(WRL, 2016)

     



     

    What will be the impacts from the seawalls?

    It is generally accepted that seawalls have the following impacts on coastal processes and the beach profile (Basco, 2004 based on Dean, 1986):

    • Frontal effects – toe scour, depth increases
    • End of wall effects – flanking
    • Blockage of littoral drift when projecting into surf zone (groyne effect)
    • Reduced beach width fronting armouring

    For more information see‘Coastal Hazard Management Study – Byron Bay Embayment’ (WRL, 2016

     



     

    How will impacts be monitored?

    The monitoring program is yet to be designed, but will need
    to consider:

       1) The current regime for artificially opening the entrance to the Belongil Creek Estuary.

       2) Base line condition and triggers for review.

    It is proposed that the program would include:

       1) Ongoing monitoring of coastal processes and impacts up and downdrift of, and adjacent to coastal protection works, impacts on the Belongil Estuary, creek mouth and shorebird habitat / nesting area.

       2) Ongoing monitoring of seawall condition.

       3) Analysis, evaluation and reporting.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3

     

    How will impacts be addressed?

    Impacts from coastal protection works on beach access at both Main Beach and Belongil Beach are being mitigated through the provision of formal public beach accesses and walkways.

    In accordance with the adaptive management approach, other potential impacts and impact mitigation actions will be considered in light of the monitoring data that has been collected, and environmental, economic and social factors that are relevant at the time.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3

     

    How many years are the seawalls planned to last?

    The design life of the Belongil seawalls will be determined through the design process.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3

    What would happen if the seawalls are removed?

    The coastal erosion/recession hazard lines that are depicted in the CZMP show the position of the shoreline after a major storm, for the immediate, 2050 and 2100 timeframe (Scenario 2). Refer  Draft CZMP BBE Part B, Figure 9 and 10., Section B1

    What if nothing is done?

    The ‘status quo’ arrangements have a number of issues:

    • Council’s consultants have indicated that the works at Main Beach and Belongil Beach do not conform to modern engineering standards with identified risks in terms of structure resilience, impacts on coastal processes, coastal ecology, public use and amenity.
    • There are currently 33 residential structures and 1 commercial structure located within the immediate coastal erosion hazard zone at Belongil Beach. These structures are under  immediate threat from coastal erosion as may be generated by a large design storm. Some of these structures have planning controls requiring the relocation of a part of or the
      whole of the structure, others do not.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B2 and Appendix 3

     

    Will Belongil property owners be allowed to redevelop and intensify development on their property?

    The proposed planning controls and conditions on development in the Belongil Beach precinct are to be reviewed in accordance with the following principles:

    • providing for the minimisation of residual coastal hazard risks through the potential adaptation of development i.e. the potential relocation and/or removal of development in response to coastal hazards and dynamic physical/environmental conditions e.g. the landward movement of the erosion escarpment, or, where relevant, the damage, loss or removal of approved coastal protection works.
    • Controls shall facilitate the potential relocation and/or removal of development through consideration of elements such as structure design, materials and spatial dimensions.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, section B3.6.

    Who will be paying for the impacts caused by the Belongil seawalls?

    The intention is that the private/public funding model for the Belongil seawalls will include funds to pay for monitoring and the mitigation of impacts caused by the seawalls.

    The funding model is to be developed as per the following principles:

    To prioritise public expenditure for public benefit and apply principles of equity in determining who will fund the implementation of management strategies / actions.

    For Belongil Beach, the funding model would include both  private landholder funds and public funds, proportional to a calculation of the benefit derived through the provision of the seawall.

    A hypothetical funding model is presented at Draft CZMP BBE Part B - Table 10 and 11, Section B3.6. This model measures benefit in terms of beach frontage.

     

Main Beach seawall / Jonson St Protection Works

    What are the main actions in the draft CZMP for managing coastal hazards at Jonson Street Main Beach?

    The main coastal hazard risk management strategy for Jonson Street Main Beach is the upgrade of the Jonson Street Protection Works – a rock seawall adjacent the Main Beach car park. The upgrade is designed to increase sand bypassing of the current structure, provide for coastal hazard protection to an engineered standard, and improve public access and amenity at this important location. The design includes improved public beach access and Council has also resolved to incorporate a viewing platform.

    The endorsed design is at Draft CZMP BBE Part B Figure 20.

     

    What is the Jonson Street Protection Works, is this the seawall at Main Beach?

    The Jonson Street Protection Works is the seawall to the east of Main Beach, near Fish Heads and the swimming pool, Byron Bay.

    For more information see ‘Investigating the Re-design of the Jonson Street ProtectionWorks’, WorleyParsons, 2014.




     

    What is happening to the seawall at Main Beach / Jonson Street?

    A main action in the CZMP for Main Beach is the upgrade of the Jonson Street Protection Works.

    The upgrade is designed to increase sand bypassing of the current structure by removing the spur groynes, provide for coastal hazard protection to an engineered standard, and improve public access and amenity at this important location, noting the design includes the provision of public beach access and a viewing platform.

    The endorsed design is shown at Draft CZMP BBE Part B Figure 20.

    How will the Main Beach seawall affect surfing conditions?

    The consultants did not consider that there would be significant impacts on the surf breaks adjacent the works as a result of the upgrade and removal of the groynes, as follows:

    • There may be some temporary re-distribution of sand in the nearshore … but most of this
      transport would be along the shoreline and not in the vicinity of the wreck, where there would not be expected to be much change in the distribution of sand beyond the natural variation. 
    • The slug of sand transport resulting from removal of the spur groynes may initially increase the beach berm width in front of the First Sun Caravan Park…. The temporary increase in sand transport from east to west caused by removal of the groynes represents only a small portion of the overall sediment budget for the area. 
    • The surf breaks are in part controlled by the presence of subtidal rock reefs in the
      area and this would still be the case following removal of the groynes.

    For more information see ‘Investigating the Re-design of the Jonson Street Protection Works’, WorleyParsons, 2014.



     

    How will impacts from the upgrade be managed?

    According to Council’s consultants the impacts from the upgrade are expected to be minor. The upgrade is designed to increase sand bypassing of the current structure, provide for coastal hazard protection to an engineered standard, and improve public access and amenity at this important location, noting the design includes the provision of public beach access and a viewing
    platform.

    The endorsed design is shown at Draft CZMP BBE Part B Figure 20.

    Impacts will be monitored e.g. beach profile changes adjacent, up and down drift of the works. In accordance with the adaptive management approach, potential impacts and impact mitigation actions will be considered in light of the monitoring data that has been collected, and environmental, economic and social factors that are relevant at the time.

    For more information see ‘Investigating the Re-design of the Jonson Street Protection Works’, WorleyParsons, 2014

     


     




Offsite impacts

    How may Tyagarah Beach be affected by the seawalls?

    The consultants (BMT WBM, 2013) concluded that impacts of the coastal protection works along Byron Bay/Belongil Spit are now being experienced at Byron North Shore, north of Belongil Creek, and that future recession there will be greater under a Belongil seawall scenario (with works at Main Beach), when compared with a no Belongil seawall scenario (with works at Main Beach). Refer Draft CZMP BBE, Part B, Figure 15 - section B2.2.1.

    For further information see ‘Byron Shire Coastline Hazards Assessment Update’ (BMT WBM, 2013)

     

    Will the seawalls affect Belongil Creek?

    In accordance with the modelling undertaken by Council’s consultants (BMT WBM, 2013), recession of the shoreline to the creek is likely to occur under both a Belongil seawalls and no Belongil seawalls scenario. Under a Belongil seawalls scenario, shoreline recession would be confined to the north of development on Belongil Spit. Under a no Belongil seawalls scenario, the recession of the shoreline to the creek could occur between Manfred Street and the north of Belongil Spit.

    The consultants noted that the behaviour of the creek is complex and difficult to predict , as is evident from the following quotes from Council’s most recent hazard study (BMT WBM, 2013):

    The behaviour of the creek in response to shoreline recession that would break through to the creek behind Belongil Spit is somewhat speculative and uncertain.  The entrance could shift
    south to the Manfred Street area where the creek turns northward behind the Spit leaving the North Shore shoreline to adjust its form and alignment to the receded shoreline alignment. 
    Alternatively, the creek may again meander towards the north in a manner similar to that which formed the Spit previously, at a more landward alignment commensurate with the receding shoreline position.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE Part B, section B2.2.1 and ‘Byron Shire Coastline Hazards Assessment update’ (BMT WBM, 2013)

     

    Will roosting, nesting and feeding seabirds and shorebirds near the Belongil Creek entrance be affected by the seawalls? Will threatened species such as shorebirds and nesting turtles be affected by the seawalls?

    This is unknown, there are a number of factors that require consideration:

    • what changes in the morphology of Belongil Creek would have occurred without the current works (Main Beach and Belongil Beach)
    • what is the impact of the current works (Main Beach and Belongil Beach) on the morphology of Belongil Creek and the entrance
    • are seabirds and shorebirds affected by these impacts, in what way (positive, negative, neutral etc)

    It is proposed that the monitoring programs that accompany the Main Beach and Belongil Beach works will provide data and a greater understanding of these issues.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE Part B3

    What will happen if the seawalls cause impacts on the Belongil Creek or the beach towards Tyagarah?

    First, the impacts will need to be assessed and then mitigation actions will need to be considered. If the impacts are substantial, and the mitigation actions required are substantial (funds, resources) then the CZMP may need to be reviewed and the various impact mitigation options will need to be considered in accordance with statutory requirements.

    For more information see Draft CZMP BBE Part B3

Climate change

    Has climate change been considered in the seawall design?

    The seawall design is preliminary at the moment. The seawall design process will determine the proposed life of the works and the extent to which climate change and sea level rise needs to be incorporated into the design parameters.

    For further information see Draft CZMP BBE Part B3

     




    What if sea level rise is greater than predicted or storms become more intense and more frequent and the seawalls aren’t big enough or high enough?

    The proposed seawall will be ‘adaptable’, with conditions on development providing for:

    • maintenance, potential upgrade, modification and/or potential removal of the works and rectification of the beach.

    For further information see Draft CZMP BBE Part B3

Submissions process

    How can I voice my opinion on the draft CZMP, how can I be heard?

    The Draft Coastal Zone Management Plan Byron Bay Embayment (CZMP BBE) is on public exhibition from 21 May to 14 June 2016 and a hardcopy is available for inspection at Council's Administration Office, Station Street Mullumbimby, between the hours of  9.00am and 4.00pm, Monday to Friday and at Byron Library, Lawson Street, Byron Bay.

    Make a submissions by 14 June, in writing and addressed to the General Manager, Byron Shire Council, PO Box 219 Mullumbimby 2482 or sent by email to submissions@byron.nsw.gov.au

    For further information, submit a question online or call the CZMP BBE hotline - (02) 6626 7243

    Submissions in response to the CZMP BBE will be made public, subject to the relevant provisions of the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009.